Gravity is the Word

My book “Gravity is the Word” is now ready for review.

The book is a synthesis of theology, philosophy, and the sciences.

The consensus of our times is that the cosmos is as it is due to “the law of gravity” (i.e. without the law of gravity, doing what it does, the cosmos would be a completely dark and homogeneous blank).

The law of gravity has become some kind of dumb god, which although it created the cosmos, is, apparently less conscious than even human beings!

Richard Dawkins, our famous “Professor for the Public Understanding of Science” has worked out that:  “It does not make much sense to pray to the law of gravity”  (The God Delusion, Richard Dawkins).

But if we humans are the result of unconscious processes, then we are bound to ask ourselves what human consciousness is.

Are we outside observers of the cosmos, puzzling about the vast age and size of the cosmos?  Or are we the cosmos observing itself, in which case you would need to admit that the cosmos is conscious.  But even this creates problems.  Why am I “I” and not “you”?  And why do we feel that we are not the cosmos?

Why do we feel somehow detached from the cosmos, and self-conscious, and unlike all other creatures, conscious of our nakedness?  Why are we conscious that we are conscious?

No-one I know, or with whom I would want to keep company, goes through life saying “I am the cosmos”, or that “I am the law of gravity”.  What we today describe with the metaphorical words “law” and “Gravity” are a complete mystery to contemporary science.  We have replaced one universalising mystery, “the Word of God”, with another universalising mystery, “Law of Gravity” (which, although it forms and governs everything in the cosmos, is, we are persuaded since Einstein, as dead and as predictable as a machine or a set of mathematical equations).

Isaac Newton – who gave the world the concept of universal gravitation – understood that the key to understanding the cosmos is the divinely revealed micro-cosmos:  God’s revelation to man through the People Israel.  He therefore spent more of his life (50 continuous years in fact) studying the geometries and measurements of Jerusalem Temple than any other subject.  Historians of science today generally think that he was wasting his time.  In my book I prove that Newton got his theory of gravity from his knowledge of the Jerusalem Temple.  We need merely look at the relationship between the (square) Holy of Holies to the Holy Place to see the inverse square law.

We cannot ignore the work of Einstein of course.  His science was the foundation of the modern world, including my ability to type these characters into my computer and share them with you.  But, in my book, I challenge Einstein’s atheism and the relativistic worldview that his philosophy engendered.  In some ways, I rehabilitate Newton.

As I write in the last sentence of the Prologue:

One cannot meaningfully discuss Gravity without discussing Israel (and vice versa), and this is because the Creator of the Heavens is Lord of History of the Nations, centred on His Chosen People and the Apple of His Eye.

Click here to download the PDF:
Gravity is the Wordpdficon_large

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Painting of the Thames Diamond Jubilee Pageant – 3 June 2012

Thames Pageant - Royal Flotilla Enters the City of London

Following a bit of a creative hiatus I’ve now completed what I think is my best painting since I launched myself in the art business nearly a year ago.
  
I think my two City-of-London paintings would make a great pair of prints for commercial premises. At a metre across (unframed) they’re probably too large for most homes, although maybe I will get them published in an optional smaller format.

Full details of the painting can be seen on my web site: Thames Pageant Painting

I am becoming more and more interested in our capital city, and it will be the target for further paintings I’m sure.  However I haven’t forgotten my Yorkshire roots and I’m planning to paint the capital of Brittianica Inferior, York or Eboracum, also a fascinating city which at one time competed for power with London, and was even for a time the seat of power of the Roman Empire.

City of London Paintings

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Realist painting versus photography

There are some very good ‘photo-realist’ artists around, who render photographs in oil paint or other media, aiming for near-perfect copies.  Whilst this requires very skilled craftsmanship, it is not my idea of art:  the creative process has all been done by the photographer rather than the painter.

Nevertheless the camera is an invaluable tool for a realist artist, just as the camera obcsura was for artists in centuries past, but I decided some time ago that I don’t want to just become a sort of human photocopier.  As an artist I feel that I should bring something to the party. The Thames Pageant painting gave me the ideal opportunity to demonstrate what a realist artist can achieve with imagination and creativity, especially when one considers that the Thames Pageant is possibly the most photographed event in history – in view of the fact that were over a million spectators lining the Thames, and the great majority with camera or mobile-phone camera.  According to an article I read recently, around 300 million photos were taken, and 70 million photo images have been shared on social networks.

I’m happy with the result, believing I’ve created an aesthetically pleasing realist image of the Royal flotilla entering the City of London.  A similar image couldn’t possibly have been achieved with a camera, even with photo-editing software, for the following reasons:

1.  A camera cannot see around obstructions (or imagine they weren’t there) !

2.  A camera cannot see sharply through the rain

3.  A camera computes the scene with a single exposure (this is why photographs of sunsets invariably disappoint), whereas the human eye can constantly adjust, many times a second, to correctly process the information it’s presented with.

4. The camera has a limited depth of field, whereas the human eye is constantly focusing and re-focusing on near and distant objects.

5. The human eye can effectively look in several directions at once, because it can quickly scan to take in all the essential information in a large scene.

6.  The camera has no imagination:  it cannot choose to see from an imaginary vantage point, and it cannot significantly rearrange what it sees.  (Of course, photo-editing software can be used to rearrange things, but within limits.)

I don’t think it would have been possible to get a realistic photograph on 3 June, which had details of all elements of the pageant:  boats, spectators, the cityscape, the sky and the river.

It certainly wouldn’t have been possible to get a photograph of the scene in the painting, because of the many physical obstructions between the camera and subject matter.  In other words, the camera, even with editing software, does not make the realist artist redundant, despite popular belief to the contrary.

In the 1800s, Impression was in part a reaction to the emerging new technology of photography, but in fact it is now easy to create an impressionistic image with a click of a mouse, in programs such as Photoshop.

Studying the famous Caneletto painting of the Lord Mayor’s river pageant, said to be the inspiration for the recent Jubilee Pageant, it is obvious to me that even if cameras had been invented at the time, it would not have been possible to get an image anything like the painted one:  Caneletto has been very creative with perspective to give his painting maximum interest and impact.  He had to make compromises, which is why, on careful observation, some of the boats towards the right of his painting appear as if they’re being rowed uphill.

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Lucca – Mai 2012

Merci à toutes et à Marco.

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La contrainte, c’est la liberté !

A French friend once told me that ‘constraint is freedom’.  Well-travelled, she leads groups of artists on travel-sketching holidays.  She always sets constraints, such as : “you have 30 minutes, and you must choose a subject between here and the end of the street”.

Strange as it may seem, this sort of constraint is actually quite liberating.  The big decisions have been made, and the artist is now free to release his or her creativity and problem-solving skills on the subject, rather than spend all day wandering around a town or city trying to decide which is the ‘best’ scene to depict.  

I find myself in the fortunate position of working on corporate commissions (in the finance and hotel-and-leisure sectors). It is  liberating and will, I’m convinced, lead to my best work yet.   

The more I think about it, nearly all the creatives I admire, in all genres, produced oeuvres to commission:  Mozart, Vermeer, Shakespeare . . . . .

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Painting the Square Mile

When I’m painting something, be it a portrait, landscape, skyscape or cityscape, I like to ‘get under the skin’ and find out what’s going on. Why are those clouds the shape they are? Why do those bare twigs make the … Continue reading

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Just a sketch

John (graphite on paper)

John: artist and philosopher. A quick sketch before venturing out to the pub to put the world to rights.

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